Emergency Resources at Hufnagle Insurance Group

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Business Disaster Planning

Major disasters, such as earthquakes and large-scale power outages, are rare. Smaller disasters, such as server failure, burst pipes and fires however happen every day. Companies often prepare for the worst but forget the everyday challenges, which can be just as crippling.

When disaster strikes, having a plan and being able to put it into immediate action can mean the difference between staying open to service the needs of your customers and community or shutting down for a few days. Having a plan can ensure that you're back in business quickly and able to provide products and services to your community.

Make a Plan | Ready.gov: There are actions that should be taken before, during and after an event that are unique to each hazard. Identify the hazards that have happened or could happen in your area and plan for the unique actions for each. Local Emergency management offices can help identify the hazards in your area and outline the local plans and recommendations for each.

Disaster Planning | The U.S. Small Business Administration | SBA.gov: Business owners invest a tremendous amount of time, money and resources to make their ventures successful, yet, many owners fail to properly plan and prepare for disaster situations. According to the Institute for Business and Home Safety, an estimated 25 percent of businesses do not reopen following a major disaster. You can protect your business by identifying the risks associated with natural and man-made disasters, and by creating a plan for action should a disaster strike.

Institute for Business and Home Safety | IBHS: Planning helps business owners prepare for and more quickly and effectively recover from a disaster or any business interruption. IBHS provides a variety of resources to assist with this important process. With its non-technical language and streamlined layout, this kit provides even the smallest businesses with big business resources to create a customized plan that suits their needs.

 

Home and Family Disaster Resources

Disaster can strike quickly and without warning. It can force you to evacuate your neighborhood or confine you to your home. What would you do if basic services, such as water, gas, electricity, or telephones were cut off?

Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster, but they cannot reach everyone right away. Families can and do cope with disaster by preparing in advance and working together as a team. Knowing what to do is your best protection and your responsibility.

The Disaster Center: The choices that people make in disaster situations may determine if they and their loved ones live, die, are injured or other wise harmed. The material presented through the Disaster Center is a collaborative work by the agencies listed at the bottom of each page of the disaster guide. The guide is an attempt to present the best advice for most natural disaster situations. The advice given is considered to be the best advice for people in situations that are extremely dangerous.

CDC Emergency Preparedness and You | Make a Plan: Many people are concerned about the possibility of a public health emergency such as a natural disaster, act of terrorism, or disease outbreak. You can take steps now to help you prepare for an emergency and cope if an emergency happens. To help you prepare, the Center for Disease Control has provided step-by-step actions you can take beforehand to protect yourself and your loved ones.

American Red Cross: The Red Cross opens shelters to make sure people have a safe place to stay, a hot meal and access to other support from trained volunteers. Every night a person stays in a shelter counts as one overnight stay; for example, a family of four staying in a shelter for three nights would total 12 overnight stays.

Federal Emergency Management Agency: FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from and mitigate all hazards.

National Fire Protection Association: The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is a global nonprofit organization, established in 1896, devoted to eliminating death, injury, property and economic loss due to fire, electrical and related hazards.

National Weather Service: The National Weather Service provides weather, water, and climate data, forecasts and warnings for the protection of life and property and enhancement of the national economy.

U.S. Geological Survey: U.S. Geological Survey provides science about the natural hazards that threaten lives and livelihoods; the water, energy, minerals, and other natural resources we rely on; the health of our ecosystems and environment; and the impacts of climate and land-use change. Their scientists develop new methods and tools to supply timely, relevant, and useful information about the Earth and its processes.